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NIKE: Just Blew It

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Heavy Drama

Categories: People-Meghan McCain, People-John McCain

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My Big Fat Freak Funeral

Categories: People-John McCain, People-Meghan McCain

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BANDOLERO! (1968) Film Review

BANDOLERO! (1968)
PG-13 | 1h 46min | Action, Crime, Drama | 1 June 1968 (USA)
DIRECTOR: Andrew V. McLaglen
WRITERS: James Lee Barrett (screenplay), Stanley Hough (story)
CAST: James Stewart, Dean Martin, Raquel Welch, George Kennedy, Denver Pyle, Will Geer, Andrew Prine, Harry Carey Jr.

SYNOPSIS: Mace Bishop masquerades as a hangman in order to save his outlaw brother from the gallows, runs to Mexico chased by the Sheriff's posse and fights against Mexican bandits.

REVIEW: 5 STARS!!
My favorite movie ever. No question.
Seeing this as a 9 year old brought me that much closer to puberty. But it turns out to have also been technically superb, well written, amazingly cast and the music is hauntingly beautiful. The more I've watched it the better it gets.

How can another film compete with this combo?:

1) James Stewart - Possibly the most-loved film actor of the 20th Century, plays Mace Bishop, the charming and surprisingly flawed "good" older brother to outlaw Dee (Martin).
2) Dean Martin - Arguably the most successful entertainer in three mediums (film, music, TV) plays lovable, gentle bank robber Dee Bishop who doesn't want to kill anyone but suffers the consequences of hiring trigger happy amateurs to ride with him.
3) Raquel Welch - The most beautiful American actress of the 1960s-1970s- plays the recently-widowed, former-prostitute (and now very wealthy) Mrs. Maria Stoner.


4) Andrew V,McLaglen - Director of several major westerns and TV's Gunsmoke. Son of actor Victor McLaglen.
5) Jerry Goldsmith - the Best film scorer ever with one of his finest scores in this film.
6) Partly filmed in Bracketville, TX on the amazing set of John Wayne's Alamo Ranch.
7) Simple and (ironically) natural love story between Dee and Maria.
8) Perfectly timed humor between Stewart and Martin.
9) George Kennedy as the fumbling romantic foil.
10) Evil Mexican banditos (bandoleros) trying to rape Raquel.
11) Our heroes killing the evil Mexicans.
12) Clever plot twists.

Categories: Film Review, Film

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The Super Bowl of All Funerals

Categories: People-John McCain, People-Meghan McCain

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Moo-Ghan McCain

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CHIMP FICTION

This is how to call "Bullshit" or "Fake News" on the Obama/Jarrett Administration...

Categories: Politics, People-Barack Obama

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PATERNO (2018) Film Review

PATERNO (2018)
TV-MA | 1h 45min | Biography, Sport | TV Movie 7 April 2018
Director: Barry Levinson
Writers: Debora Cahn, John C. Richards
Stars: Al Pacino, Kathy Baker, Riley Keough

SYNOPSIS: Exactly one day after becoming the winningest coach in college football history, Penn State's Joe Paterno (Pacino) becomes engulfed in the Jerry Sandusky sexual abuse scandal. Paterno's 61 year legacy is immediately challenged and he is forced to face questions of institutional failure in regard to the victims.

REVIEW: 4.5/5.0 Stars

Picture this: A long tenured King suddenly finds himself embroiled in a wedge between the mad adulation of his loyal minions and a sudden attack by an invading enemy. So near to his natural end, he thinks to himself: Why me? Why now? What have I done to deserve this?

Sounds like one of Sophocles' Theban plays, right?

Well, not quite, but you're closer than you think.

As we all learned in the Fall of 2012, a real-life Greek tragedy unfolded in the city-state of State College, PA. And the king, was coach Joe Paterno, affectionately known as "Joe-Pah" to his campus army. The invading force was the sudden national news frenzy (and resulting conflagration) over the indictment of pedophile Jerry Sandusky and the demands for culpability by Campus Officials.

The story takes place during ONE week in the life of the Paterno family. And it is quite possibly one of the strangest 7 days that any man of preeminence has ever endured. A monumental reversal of fortunes. A sheer collapse from citadel to sewer. And all of the emotions that you might imagine (absurdity, disbelief, irony, regret, self-examination, anger, betrayal, embarrassment) course through Paterno's eyes we see his life's canvas being gessoed clean with no chance of reversing it in his lifetime. And he knows it.

Most of the film's action is set in the modest Paterno family home. The first scene in the home is later in the evening after the record-breaking win over Univ of Illinois. Not one to celebrate, the 84 year old genius coach is already busy watching game films in preparation for next week's opponent, Univ of Nebraska.

But a few feet way at the kitchen table, his wife and sons are reviewing gory details online about the Jerry Sandusky indictment. Sandusky was a former Assistant Coach at Penn State, fired 10 years earlier. The more the family reads details aloud, the more the coach demands solitude and isolation--so that he can focus on his work.

The next few days are a steady drip of new facts, additional tension and on-campus physical conflict.

It soon becomes apparent that damage control is required before Thursday's weekly pre-game news conference. Knowing that this event will turn into a media circus the family consults a professional for his legal opinion and realize that the only way out is to have the king fall on his sword.

But, before Joe can resign, the University Trustees cancel the Press Conference and swiftly fire whomever they believe to have been culprits, enablers and facilitators in Sandusky's crimes. Paterno is one of the sacrificial lambs. But was he really only a lamb? Or did he know more facts and perhaps even decades earlier? This question is posited in the final scene.

Al Pacino's acting is as fine as you'd expect. He IS Joe Paterno. The aging and ailing genius is right there in front of us. Every creak in his hip and pain in his head are demonstrated through physical action and very conservative dialog. Joe is not a speechy man. He is a leader and a icon, so Pacino employs the "Less is More" axiom with amazing results. Kathy Baker as Paterno's wife is also outstanding in her conflicted transformation through Hell Week. Playing Sara Ganim, the cub reporter from Harrisburg who broke the story, is Riley Keough (grand-daughter of Elvis Presley). Keough is appropriately cast as an inexperienced newbie who gets a once-in-a-lifetime shot at a Pulitzer Prize.

Very sad, devastating and heartbreaking on all sides. No survivors are left unscathed.

But, hopefully, future narcissistic pedophiles like Jerry Sandusky will be brought to justice sooner through greater awareness, better preparation and unrelenting diligence.

Categories: Film Review

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Who the Hell is Barack Obama?

Wayne Allyn Root is on FB.
I connected with him a few years ago and we shared stories about Columbia and Obama.

Consistent with this story is the fact that George Stephanopoulos, Class of 1982 (a year ahead of Root), also had no idea who Obama was. And Georgie was also a Poli-Sci major.

Wouldn't you expect a consummate journalist, who's done dozens of interviews with Obama, would ask him point blank: "Why doesn't anyone, including me, know who you were at Columbia?"

Ever the socialist shill, Stephanopoulos only helped Obama's ghost story, instead of doing the RIGHT THING.

https://www.theblaze.com/contributions/barack-obama-the-ghost-of-columbia-university

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WE OWN THE NIGHT (2007) Film Review

WE OWN THE NIGHT (2007)
R | 1h 57min | Crime, Drama, Thriller
DIR: James Gray
CAST: Joaquin Phoenix, Mark Wahlberg, Eva Mendes, Robert Duvall, Tony Musante

A New York City nightclub manager tries to save his brother and father (both high ranking police officers) from Russian Mafia hitmen.

Decent drama with some good performances all around.
For fans of BLUE BLOODS on CBS TV, this film appears to have been the inspiration for that series.

Categories: Film Review

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